Tips and Tricks for a More Energy Efficient Office

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Tips and Tricks for a More Energy Efficient Office

Maybe you’re a small business owner, or an energy-conscious employee. Either way, it is never a bad idea to make sure that your office is as efficient as possible. Not only would you save money on an electric bill, but you can rest easy knowing that you’re helping the environment.

Go To Sleep

Energy saving modes on computers, printers, and fax machines all save around seventy percent of the power that they would be using if you just left them on. Make sure energy saving mode is enabled on all your devices. Taking it a step further, before you leave for lunch put your computer in sleep mode. Doing this will ensure that you’re using minimal power. If you can, switch to laptops – they use about eighty percent less energy than desktop computers. And when you leave your office, power your computer all the way down for the day.

Update Your Fridge

If your office has a fridge that hasn’t been updated recently, it’s probably sapping power. An Energy Star fridge could be available to you at a discounted price depending on the year of your fridge. Getting a new refrigerator could save you more than a hundred dollars per year, so the investment you make will pay itself off sooner than you might think.

Get a Bright Idea

Energy saving light bulbs last anywhere from ten to twenty-five times longer than outdated light bulbs. Depending on your old model of bulb, you can save around fifty dollars a year just by making a simple switch to LED light bulbs. If you can’t make the switch with all the lights in your office, you can do your part by replacing any personal lighting you might have in your work area or at your desk.

Switch To Power Strips

When electronic devices are plugged into power outlets, even if the devices are off, they can still sap power. When cords are plugged into a power strip, it’s easier for the strip to be powered off than having to go and unplug each machine individually.

Keep the Door Closed

It may seem like a simple step, but when your air is treated to be either warmer or cooler than the outside temperature, leaving doors open can sap the treated air. If you have freight doors, leaving them open can lose a large amount of the conditioned air. Sealing cracks in doors and making sure they’re airtight also helps keep the air in or out. Keeping your thermostat at 72 degrees in the winter or less and 76 degrees more in the summer also helps reduce your energy bill.

Don’t Print

Reading your documents on the computer can help cut back on energy output that you would have expended by printing. And, surprise surprise, it also saves paper, which is you doing your part to help the environment even further.

Educate Your Employees

The best way to get everyone to be as green and responsible with energy as possible is to let them know how they’re using it. F.A.S.T. Rescue has a course on energy efficiency in the workplace designed to teach how to set an energy efficient strategy into place. The more you know, the more conscious you can be of your carbon footprint and the steps you can take to reduce it.


CPR Ten Years Ago vs. CPR Today: What’s Changed

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CPR Ten Years Ago vs. CPR Today: What’s Changed

If you took a CPR class any time in the last ten years, well, it’s time to take it again. The methods that you thought you knew have changed. And they’ve changed almost completely.

The guidelines are updated once every five years, which means that they’ve gone through two major revisions in a decade.

Psst – if you don’t know what CPR actually stands for, it’s cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which was introduced in 1960. Since then, and since 2010, it’s been evolving to be the most effective rescue method that it can be.

No Giving Up

In the past, CPR was thought to be useless once the patient reached a certain point past the possibility to be revived. However, cases where a patient was recovered after long periods of CPR – one being 96 minutes – turned this notion on its head.

Now CPR is encouraged to be administered until a medical professional arrives and can take over the job. Chest compressions keep the blood flowing to a patient’s brain, which can increase their probability of survival no matter how long it’s taking for help to arrive.

Goodbye, Rescue Breaths

When you think of CPR, you probably visualize someone either doing chest compressions or performing mouth to mouth resuscitation. However, rescue breaths are no longer taught when showing someone how to deliver CPR to a patient.

Take this info with a grain of salt – medical professionals and people with advanced certifications still do perform mouth to mouth, but the American Health Association deemed it less useful for non-medical professionals to perform the procedure. Chest compressions are more important in keeping the patients alive, so the attention is now focused on teaching this method alone.

People without professional medical training have been proven more likely to remember CPR steps during an emergency if they were as simplified as possible. Focusing just on chest compressions increases the patient’s chances of surviving, eliminates worry about transferring disease, and helps get rid of potential error in CPR performance.

No More “Look, Listen, and Feel”

At one point, CPR training included telling students to stop and assess the victim by checking for breath and feeling to see if there’s a problem. Now, they’ve determined it’s pretty much obvious when someone needs CPR to be performed on them, and precious seconds are wasted during the old method. Now, students are told to call 911 as soon as they realize there’s a problem, and start administering CPR as quickly as possible.

A Change of Steps

Old CPR guidelines dictated that students follow A-B-C steps in the order of clearing the patient’s airway, giving rescue breaths, and then delivering chest compressions. Airway, breaths, compression – A-B-C.

Now, there’s essentially just C – but the other steps still apply in a minor way, if the student is more versed in CPR and the steps are applicable. Now, the steps could be seen as C-A-B, with breaths being the least important step.

An Updated Ratio

About a decade ago, it was taught that for every two breaths students should administer fifteen compressions. Now, the ratio is taught as two breaths for every 30 compressions, if breaths are used at all. This increases the emphasis on chest compressions and takes it away from breathing. Compressions are what circulates the victim’s blood flow to the brain, which is what keeps them alive.

Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger

Old guidelines stipulated that students push about one and a half two inches for each compression on the victim’s chest. Now, it’s recommended that the student push two inches at least, if not more. The worry that resulted in the old guidelines less vigorous compressions was that the victim’s ribs might break, but now it’s determined that harder compressions could save a victim’s life, even if some of their ribs are broken.

100 compressions per minute or more are now recommended to be delivered to a victim, whereas before it was about 100 or less.

Obviously, you need to refresh your CPR skills. Luckily, you can do so easily with CPR classes from FAST Rescue.


Working at Heights: Safety Tips for a Dangerous Job

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Working at Heights: Safety Tips for a Dangerous Job

Working at heights is literally as it sounds: when you see construction crews on high level buildings, they’re working at heights. It’s working from anywhere that a fall could be considered debilitating. Thought your office job was stressful? Imagine having to worry about falling every time you take a step. Continue reading Working at Heights: Safety Tips for a Dangerous Job


Don’t Be This Guy, Let Us Help You

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Don’t Be This Guy, Let Us Help You

Would you like to cost your company $60,000 by failing to comply with safety orders? Probably not, right?

One coffee shop operator in Stittsville, Ontario, did just that in 2017. In response to an incident, a inspector visited the shop – all pretty routine.

When the inspector visited the shop, he realized that a few of the shop’s safety standards weren’t quite up to code. Unfortunate, but again, not all-together unusual or out of place. Continue reading Don’t Be This Guy, Let Us Help You


10 Workplace Safety Signs Guaranteed To Make You Laugh

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10 Workplace Safety Signs Guaranteed To Make You Laugh

Workplace safety is no joke. But sometimes, we get caught up in taking things so seriously, that we don’t let ourselves have any fun. It’s important to find that balance, and let yourself lighten up every now and then. These signs will definitely help. Continue reading 10 Workplace Safety Signs Guaranteed To Make You Laugh


Top Three Benefits of Offering Safety Training for Your Staff

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Top Three Benefits of Offering Safety Training for Your Staff

Many companies think about offering safety training to their staff simply because it’s a requirement to meet regulatory needs. The truth is that proper safety training delivers benefits above and beyond maintaining the requirements that Canadian regulations dictate.

Continue reading Top Three Benefits of Offering Safety Training for Your Staff


5 Reasons to Outsource Employee Training

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5 Reasons to Outsource Employee Training

Employee training is a broad and very complex topic; it requires deep knowledge of federal, provincial, local, industry, and role-specific rules and regulations and can be accompanied by extensive fines and penalties if not done and documented correctly. While some organizations choose to maintain employee training in-house, the most risk-adverse and safety-focused organizations outsource training to experts like F.A.S.T. Rescue. Here, we’ll outline the five primary reasons clients choose to outsource employee training.

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Fostering Safer Factories: Employee Protection Tips In The Manufacturing Industry

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Fostering Safer Factories: Employee Protection Tips In The Manufacturing Industry

As an employer in the manufacturing industry, safety is both a moral responsibility and a necessity for success. If you want to get the best and brightest people working in your facilities, you have to demonstrate that you care about your workers. There’s no way to do that without first preventing all the worst hazards of your industry. The following tips will help you keep those hazards to a minimum and safeguard your workers for the long haul:

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Activity Enhancements: Simple Tips To Stay Active In The Workplace

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Activity Enhancements: Simple Tips To Stay Active In The Workplace

Never overlook the importance of a fit workforce. Employees who stay active aren’t just healthier; they’re also happier and more productive. This means that if you successfully encourage your workers to exercise, there are direct benefits for your company. Through the following tips, you can incorporate exercise into your daily activities, helping both your workers’ health and your bottom line:

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Handling The Heat: Tips To Prevent Burns In The Food Service Industry

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Handling The Heat: Tips To Prevent Burns In The Food Service Industry

As a restaurant, catering service, or other business in the food industry, one of the greatest threats to your employees is burns. Anyone who needs to handle or cook hot food is at risk, especially if the food in question is fried, grilled, or baked. Only by taking the proper safety precautions can you ensure that none of your workers is seriously injured. The following strategies will help you shore up burn safety in the workplace, protecting your staff from every variety of hot hazard:

Continue reading Handling The Heat: Tips To Prevent Burns In The Food Service Industry