What You Need To Know About Staying Safe While Working In Extreme Heat

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What You Need To Know About Staying Safe While Working In Extreme Heat

When you think of dangerous jobs, you might think of firefighting. You might think of being a pilot. Maybe you think of something more technical, like welding.

Those are all dangerous jobs, and all of them involve heat in some way or another. And it’s very likely your job can involve heat, especially if you work outside and the climate changes unexpectedly.

You might think it’s tornados. Fires. Hurricanes. But the biggest weather-related danger to people in the United States is actually extreme heat. Every single year, hundreds of people sustain injuries from working in extreme heat, or even die.

Athletes, too, particularly need to watch out for heat-related illnesses. Before they can even realize it’s happening, they can become dizzy and faint. That’s all due to exertional heat stroke, or EHS.

Heat Related Illnesses

Heat stroke and exertional heat stroke are both very serious illnesses that can occur when working in extreme heat.

Heat Stroke

Heat stroke is what happens when your body’s core temperature goes about 40°C. This extreme rise in temperature of the body makes it so your body is no longer capable of regulating itself. The signs start to show when a person acts disoriented or confused. They can also faint. Heat stroke can put someone at risk for permanent damage. It could result in brain, heart, or kidney damage. Sometimes, it can even be fatal.

Exertional Heat Stroke

When someone is experiencing exertional heat stroke, it doesn’t necessarily need to be extremely warm outside. Athletes are the people who most frequently deal with exertional heat stroke. The high temperatures in their body is caused by their own physical exertion. People who work in labor outside can also be very susceptible to this type of heat stroke.

Heat Exhaustion

This is generally what someone will experience before it leads to full heat stroke. The person will sweat excessively, which means their body is still able to cool itself down from the heat. They can still experience confusion and exhaustion, and if not treated immediately, can result in heat stroke.

Heat Cramps

When your body is lacking in electrolytes, it can result in cramping of the arms, legs, or stomach. A person experiencing heat cramps needs to rest and hydrate, which will alleviate the symptoms.

How to Stay Safe in Extreme Heat

All heat related illnesses are preventable. The more informed you are about heat illnesses when you’re working in extreme heat, the safer you’ll be. Awareness is the number one thing that’s going to prevent people from getting heat stroke, heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or any other type of illness from exposing the body to too much heat.

Obviously, the best way to avoid heat illnesses is to stay out of the heat. But if you’re working in a hot environment, it can’t be avoided. If you can, increase your exposure to working in heat gradually. Instead of working the full eight hours of the day in the sun, spend some time getting used to the heat and ramping it up until you can safely work the entire day. Many cases of on the job illness occur because workers haven’t taken the time to acclimatize themselves to their conditions.

You might know exactly what we’re going to say, but hydrating your body is of the utmost importance. Drink water every fifteen minutes when working in extreme heat. Even if you’re not thirsty, it’s important to drink to keep your body hydrated before you start feeling that thirst, which means you’re on your way to being dangerously dehydrated.When you’re working somewhere hot, always plan ahead.

If you and your company need a plan, F.A.S.T. Rescue can help teach you the ropes and provide a safety course that will allow you to work in the heat without contracting any of these illnesses.


Ways To Make Workplace Safety Training More Exciting

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Ways To Make Workplace Safety Training More Exciting

When you hear the phrase “Workplace Safety Training,” do you jump for joy? The answer is probably not. In fact, it’s probably more of the opposite of that reaction. Workplace safety training can often be a very boring topic, and seem like just another chore for you to have to go through in your business as an employee or an employer.

Yet you know the importance of getting your employees trained effectively, efficiently, and comprehensively. But everyone knows that information is easier to retain when it’s presented in an easily digestible manner that people will actually enjoy.

Here’s how to get the most of your employee’s workplace safety training.

Have a Conversation

If you’re doing a presentation about workplace training or simply guiding your employees through a safety lecture, don’t do so without allowing a place for feedback. Most studies report that the education that attendees yield from lectures is relatively low. On the other hand, when you incorporate room for interaction into your presentation, retention of the topic is increased.

When you’re preparing to train your employees on safety, structure the event so you’re having a conversation with your workers. Instead of talking at them, you can talk with them, and they will feel more engaged.

A Little Incentive Never Hurt

If you used a rewards-based program as an incentive for employees to complete their training, they’ll have a whole new level of motivation associated with their task.

You can turn the training into a friendly competition, based on who can complete it in the shortest amount of time, who can score the highest on the tests, or who can answer the most questions.

You can use a gift card as a reward, or just bragging rights that they did the best. You can even offer an extended break to the person who performs the best.

Use Roleplay

Getting your head into the game with roleplay is a great way to increase retention of materials and allow the training to make a lasting impact. When you assign roles to your workers, you can act out real-life scenarios that may arise on the job. This way, your employees can engage in kinetic learning and have already been walked through a potential dangerous situation. That way, if the dangerous situation did actually arise, they’ve already experienced a similar scenario and will remember how to react.

Use Multimedia

Wherever possible, incorporate ways for your employees to interact with the information that you’re giving to them. Depending on your work situation, you can make video games that simulate situations that they might encounter, or use quizzes to keep them paying attention to the presentation at hand.

The closest you can get to simulation a real-life situation that you’re describing, the better. Not only does this make your presentation more fun, it gives workers some experience dealing with potential situations.

Get it at F.A.S.T.

You knew we were going to go there. Yes, when you do your workplace safety training with F.A.S.T., you’re getting all that exciting workplace safety training. You might have thought that the word “exciting” and “workplace safety training” couldn’t be used together in the same sentence, but we’ve got your back for engaging safety seminars of all types.

We make safety a way of life, not just a one-time training session that your employees are going to be likely to forget. We offer all measure of safety and training solutions for your business, and can consult with you to create the most effective training session possible.


What’s Hot Work Training and Why Do You Need It?

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What’s Hot Work Training and Why Do You Need It?

Hot work. That sounds like work that you do that’s a little bit spicy, right? Things get a little heated? That may be what it sounds like, but it’s not exactly right.

What Is It?

Hot work is work that produces a flame, spark, or any heat. It’s work that is often seen around construction or demolition sites. Hot work often involves cutting, welding, using arc welding equipment, portable gas, soldering, or grinding.

What’s the Danger?

Hot work can introduce fire hazards into the scenarios and areas where it is being conducted, so a high level of safety training and skill is required for the job.

With hot work, you’re frequently around gas when you’re working with flames. That means leaks could occur, and release flammable gas into the area.

Often, additional personnel are assigned to fire watch with hot work is being conducted to make sure that there is no possibility that anything greater than a minor fire could develop.

Gas detectors are also commonly put into place. If a flammable or combustible gas in the atmosphere gets to ten percent or higher of the lower explosive level, the hot work must be stopped until the source of the leak is found and repaired.

Another possible danger is flash fires. These happen when gasses like Hydrogen Sulfide or Methane build up around the wellhead area where the hot work is being performed. These gases are able to be monitored by gas detectors as well.

Work with grinding produces sparks that can cause considerable damage if the proper protective gear is not worn. Face shields are required, and fire protection equipment. Besides fire danger, fingers can also get stuck in the grinding wheel, which, needless to say, is something you wouldn’t want to happen.

Why Do You Need a Certification?

Because you’re literally playing with fire, a permit is important. A certification allows your employer to know that you’re qualified for the job you’re applying for, and you know the safety measures required of you.

When you’re safe and the area you’re working in is safe, everyone can rest assured that the job will be done well and be done securely. Besides that, every site and every employer you work for will require that you have your certification. Otherwise, you’ll be some random person wielding fire, and they won’t be able to trust you.

The Course

At F.A.S.T, creating a safe work environment is highly emphasized.

The class is four hours long, and the certification lasts for three years. You’ll learn how to identify hazards that arise with hot work. Atmospheric testing, setting up a permit system, and safeguarding areas is all also covered. You’ll be able to follow safe work policies, and not have to take another course for three more years.

Get the most comprehensive hot work training out there, because you don’t want to risk it when it comes to your safety.


Private Workplace Training

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Private Workplace Training

If you run a business, you’re well aware of the Occupational Health and Safety Act. You know, the labor law that says each employer needs to furnish their employees with a workplace that’s safe from physical hazards. And that employees must go through a workplace safety training program.

So you know you’ve got to train your employees on their safety. But are you doing the best that you can?

What Does OHSA Require?

OHSA was enacted to cover workers and protect them from safety and health hazards that might arise on the job.

It puts procedures into place for employers to be required to have a plan in case of workplace hazards. It enforces these laws, which helps create a safe workplace for employees, because employers may not have done so voluntarily in the past.

It details what to do in case of harassment, toxic substances, how to follow codes of practice, the duties of employers, and more.

You can read about the requirements of OHSA in their entirety.

So What Do You Do?

You’re aware of OHSA. So you know you need to provide your workers with safety training. There’s a lot of options out there for you to choose from. Many people might want to turn to an online training program to get the work out of the way, but online training has been proven to be much less successful than working with someone face to face.

E-learning can provide employees with the bare minimum of what they need to learn. But the information doesn’t stick in their heads as well as it does with in-person training.

Learning the safety elements in the actual field instead of learning them online provides a hands-on experience your employees wouldn’t get otherwise. It makes your program more credible, your employees even safer, and your company reputation more reputable.

In-person training sessions also eliminate the ability of your employees to slack off and miss vital information that will help keep them safe. They can ask questions specific to your business and be prepared for incidents particular to your work environment.

Private Workplace Training

F.A.S.T. private workplace training offers you any possible type of training you could need. We cover every element of the workplace safety world. Forklift training, First Aid & CPR, Fall Arrest, Spill Response, Event Coverage – there’s workplace training program for it all. Learning these safety measures effectively is critical to an employees safety and success, and it’s not something to be taken lightly.

Online Training

If you absolutely can’t work with in-person training, we’ve still got options for you with online programs. We cover everything from chainsaw safety to trenching and shoring with our online safety videos.

Whatever your need is, F.A.S.T. Rescue has just the thing to cover all the safety information out there.


What Will You Learn In a First Responder Course?

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What Will You Learn In a First Responder Course?

A first responder is a person who, in an emergency event, runs toward it instead of running away. First responders are the brave people out there on the front lines helping to save lives.

To be considered a first responder, all you really have to do is fall into that category who literally is the first to respond to a scene.

However, a certified first responder is someone who is able to provide advanced medical care, including first aid, CPR, and AED – the automated external defibrillator. A certified first responder is the lowest level of the emergency medical service team.

F.A.S.T. Rescue is a Red Cross authorized provider and can train you to become an emergency medical responder in a course designed for firefighters, EMS (emergency care instructor), and police. To become a certified first responder you must finish a course approved by your province.

What to Expect

In the class you will learn exactly what to do when faced with an emergency situation. The first responder class is a 40 hour class with flexible options for creating a schedule. When you complete the course, the certification is valid for three years. Different provinces or territories may have different types of rules and regulations in their courses, and yours will be adjusted accordingly to where you live.

The course takes about three weeks to take for full time students learning at an accelerated pace. If the student is taking the course part time it can take anywhere from eight to eleven weeks.

You will go through five parts of the course, all designed for caring for injuries and sustaining life until the higher level medical personnel arrives on the scene. Essentially, everything you are learning is designed to be pre-hospital care. The course includes CPR, HCP, and AED.

The course content in part one includes how to assess the emergency scene, and how to prevent transmission of disease.

In part two you move on to the anatomy and physiology section, where you’ll learn how to handle respiratory emergencies and how to deal with airway and ventilation issues. Circulation, bleeding, and shock are also gone over.

Part three focuses on how to respond to traumatic injuries such as head and spine injuries, soft tissue injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, and others.

When you get to part four you’ll learn how to treat sudden illnesses, and what do do in the case of poisoning. You’ll also go over how to handle heat related emergencies like heat stroke, or cold related emergencies like hypothermia.

The final part of the course instructs on special situations. These include incidents that may involve multiple casualties, transportation emergencies, or moving a patient. It also goes over what to do in the case of emergency childbirth and crisis intervention.

At the end of the course, you will take a certification exam. You pass the test if you score 80% or greater.

Get trained to save people’s lives today and take your course with F.A.S.T. Rescue.


Protective Wear, What Do You Need It For Anyway?

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Protective Wear, What Do You Need It For Anyway?

If you’ve ever worked in an industry where you need protective gear to be able to conduct your job, you know that it’s of vital importance. You can get written up for not wearing the proper safety gear, and if employees fail to wear the proper protection, potentially not survive an audit. Most importantly, you might be injured on the job if you fail to wear the proper protection.

People with regular desk jobs mostly have to worry about paper cuts or carpal tunnel syndrome, but you have to worry about life and death burns, hand protection, and eye protection.

Personal protective equipment is called PPE, and it’s required for workplaces that work with hazardous materials, fire, welding, and more.

Eye Protection

These aren’t just your regular sunglasses. Eye protection in professional fields means heavy duty protective gear that might actually prevent you from going blind. It’s an important safety precaution that your goggles fit tightly, so they don’t slip off by accident and expose your eyes to danger.

Welding goggles help you be able to withstand the heat of the products you’re working with and still be able to clearly see what you’re working on. They’re super flexible and durable, because when welding your gear tends to take a lot of wear and tear.

Other professions like chemistry, food, construction, and others, may need goggles in order to protect the eyes. It’s also necessary to have cleaning solution on hand so that vision is never restricted due to cloudy eyewear.

Fire Retardant Clothing

Fire retardant clothing is just that – it helps protect individuals from their clothing catching on fire. It usually comes in a jumpsuit form for the employee to wear, or a jacket that they can put on when needed.

The clothes are made out of industrial strength PVC and Polyester. They are usually worn at construction sites, chemical refineries, or oil and gas companies.

Gloves

You use gloves around your kitchen, but there’s a huge number of different gloves out there that you can use and are needed for various industries.

Mechanic gloves help keep their hands safe when working with heavy duty equipment and can increase the traction of a grip. Ski gloves, welders gloves, and lineman’s gloves are all examples of industry specific gloves that workplaces require.

Disposable gloves are important when working with food so that there is no contamination. Clean room gloves have much the same concept in mind, but when it comes to making electronic components instead.

Hearing Protection

It is required that employees who are exposed to noise in their workplace the exceeds 85 decibels wear hearing protection.

Hearing protection can come in the form of earplugs or ear muffs. Earplugs are used for lower noise environments that still require them, while ear muffs are necessary for areas with higher volumes of noise like construction. Air traffic controllers and factory workers also require strong hearing protection.

Masks

Facemasks and personal respirators are needed for people with jobs that deal with toxic chemicals or work that produces small fibers that would be dangerous to breath in, like carpentry.

The face mask category can range from dental face masks to gas masks, sometimes called a full face piece. An N95 masks protects the wearer against liquid or solid particles that may be dangerous to breathe.

Face pieces can lock into place to give lateral and frontal protection to the wearer against the hazards they may be working with. They attach to headgear or a bracket, and literally allow you to get your head in the game without fearing for your safety.

If you’re in need of safety gear, F.A.S.T. can be your one-stop shop for everything you require to stay safe and sound. They have all of this protective wear and more available for you to finally get some peace of mind.

All of the gear is certified by the labour boards in every workplace and business that they’re necessary for use in. Committed to health and safety supplies, you’re being well taken care of when you choose to put your safety in the hands of F.A.S.T.


How to Get First Aid and CPR Training

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How to Get First Aid and CPR Training

Learning how to perform CPR is not only a requirement for some fields, but can also help save a life. Whether you’re a nanny, a teacher, a parent, or any other field where you’re taking care of others, learning CPR can save someone’s life in an emergency. For that fact alone, CPR training is invaluable – but caregivers who have CPR training are more than two times as likely to get contacted about a job.

When you take a CPR course, you’ll come away with a number of new skills and understandings.

You’ll know how to assess the scene of the emergency, and be able to determine the needs of the person who’s in danger. Your course will teach you first aid skills for injuries like cuts and scrapes, and what to do in case of insect or snake bites.

You’ll also cover items like what to do in case of broken bones, heat stroke, neck injuries, and other non-life threatening situations. At the end of the course, you’ll know how to behave in many emergency scenarios, giving you confidence and the capacity to help others in need.

A CPR course will teach you cardiopulmonary resuscitation, preparing you in case someone is in cardiac arrest or if their chest cavity is blocked. You’ll learn the techniques to keep blood flowing through a person’s body that helps them stay alive until medical help arrives. Mostly every course teaches you how to use an automatic external defibrillator, or an AED, to deliver a shock to the patient before you begin to administer CPR.

You can take a CPR course easily online by taking it at FAST. Once you complete the course, you’ll have your CPR certification. Some occupations require that you take your CPR training in person, but many will allow you to study the process online and achieve your certification that way.

The length of the course that you choose to take often varies, and can take anywhere for three to five hours. You should space the classes out so you can retain the information more effectively, because it’s vital that you remember the steps – remembering could save someone’s life.

There is no minimum age to take First Aid or CPR training. It’s a good idea to take a refresher course every two or three years, because CPR practices are often changing.

If you want to be able to say that you can help save someone during a medical emergency, get your CPR certification today with F.A.S.T. Rescue.


Why You Need Systems 24-7 In Your Business

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Why You Need Systems 24-7 In Your Business

We don’t need to tell you twice. It’s a lot of work to manage your business and all your employees. When you think about it, it might seem overwhelming. There are so many different steps that you didn’t think about before.

Like implementing a Health and Safety program. Maybe you’re old hat, or maybe you have no idea where to even begin. Either way, it’s a multi-faceted process that will take up a lot of your valuable time if you don’t know what you’re doing.

What’s Systems 24-7?

You need System’s 24-7 on your side. It’s a one-stop portal that puts everything you need to manage your Health and Safety program together in one place. And it works for you, 24-7. See what we did there?

It’s an efficient online learning program that provides each and every employee or contractor with what they need during the training process. It gives them training, reports, policies, and forms that they may need, all bundled together in an easy interface so you don’t have to go searching through the confusing ether of papers out there.

It’s also priced modularly. You can customize it to the best fit for your company’s Health and Safety needs, and your budget.

How Does It Work?

Imagine a system that will do all the work for you. That’s what you’re going to get with the 24-7 program. You basically set it up, and let it go to work.

Learning Management

Your employees or contractors can go through courses that address your specific legal requirements regarding Health and Safety. The training courses that they go through can be specifically tailored to each employee’s specific role. You can also send them their training before they’ve even come to work, so right when they start, they’ll be fully prepared for their job.

Systems 24-7 tracks the completion of each of the courses so you don’t have to. You’ll get a comprehensive report of your employee’s progress.

Course Editor

Got a unique Health and Safety need? No problem. With the course editor, you can create your own courses to fit exactly what your business needs. You’ll be able to prove your due diligence with the reports that 24-7 will send you when your employees complete this course.

Policy Management

Your business is always changing and updating. That’s a good thing, but it means that you might have to sift through a lot of paperwork to update your employees on your policies. Not with Systems 24-7.

Systems 24-7 allows you to manage your policies and keep your employees up to date all in one place. Send off e-mails about your new protocols, store them, and catalog them. It’s that easy. You can also get reminders for when reviews are going to be conducted.

Your Resources

If you need a document, we’ve got it for you. There are hundreds of customizable resources in the resource library. These include SOPS, hazard assessments, human resource document templates, and more.

Now that you know all about what Systems 24-7 is going to do for you, why wait? You can breathe easy and focus on growing your business when you know all the Health and Safety concerns have been taken care of.

So get it today. There’s no point in putting it off any longer. Still not convinced? You can go through a demo of the program to see what it’s all about.

Oh, you also get access to all these online training courses. There’s over 200 of them. No big deal.


Tips and Tricks for a More Energy Efficient Office

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Tips and Tricks for a More Energy Efficient Office

Maybe you’re a small business owner, or an energy-conscious employee. Either way, it is never a bad idea to make sure that your office is as efficient as possible. Not only would you save money on an electric bill, but you can rest easy knowing that you’re helping the environment.

Go To Sleep

Energy saving modes on computers, printers, and fax machines all save around seventy percent of the power that they would be using if you just left them on. Make sure energy saving mode is enabled on all your devices. Taking it a step further, before you leave for lunch put your computer in sleep mode. Doing this will ensure that you’re using minimal power. If you can, switch to laptops – they use about eighty percent less energy than desktop computers. And when you leave your office, power your computer all the way down for the day.

Update Your Fridge

If your office has a fridge that hasn’t been updated recently, it’s probably sapping power. An Energy Star fridge could be available to you at a discounted price depending on the year of your fridge. Getting a new refrigerator could save you more than a hundred dollars per year, so the investment you make will pay itself off sooner than you might think.

Get a Bright Idea

Energy saving light bulbs last anywhere from ten to twenty-five times longer than outdated light bulbs. Depending on your old model of bulb, you can save around fifty dollars a year just by making a simple switch to LED light bulbs. If you can’t make the switch with all the lights in your office, you can do your part by replacing any personal lighting you might have in your work area or at your desk.

Switch To Power Strips

When electronic devices are plugged into power outlets, even if the devices are off, they can still sap power. When cords are plugged into a power strip, it’s easier for the strip to be powered off than having to go and unplug each machine individually.

Keep the Door Closed

It may seem like a simple step, but when your air is treated to be either warmer or cooler than the outside temperature, leaving doors open can sap the treated air. If you have freight doors, leaving them open can lose a large amount of the conditioned air. Sealing cracks in doors and making sure they’re airtight also helps keep the air in or out. Keeping your thermostat at 72 degrees in the winter or less and 76 degrees more in the summer also helps reduce your energy bill.

Don’t Print

Reading your documents on the computer can help cut back on energy output that you would have expended by printing. And, surprise surprise, it also saves paper, which is you doing your part to help the environment even further.

Educate Your Employees

The best way to get everyone to be as green and responsible with energy as possible is to let them know how they’re using it. F.A.S.T. Rescue has a course on energy efficiency in the workplace designed to teach how to set an energy efficient strategy into place. The more you know, the more conscious you can be of your carbon footprint and the steps you can take to reduce it.


CPR Ten Years Ago vs. CPR Today: What’s Changed

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CPR Ten Years Ago vs. CPR Today: What’s Changed

If you took a CPR class any time in the last ten years, well, it’s time to take it again. The methods that you thought you knew have changed. And they’ve changed almost completely.

The guidelines are updated once every five years, which means that they’ve gone through two major revisions in a decade.

Psst – if you don’t know what CPR actually stands for, it’s cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which was introduced in 1960. Since then, and since 2010, it’s been evolving to be the most effective rescue method that it can be.

No Giving Up

In the past, CPR was thought to be useless once the patient reached a certain point past the possibility to be revived. However, cases where a patient was recovered after long periods of CPR – one being 96 minutes – turned this notion on its head.

Now CPR is encouraged to be administered until a medical professional arrives and can take over the job. Chest compressions keep the blood flowing to a patient’s brain, which can increase their probability of survival no matter how long it’s taking for help to arrive.

Goodbye, Rescue Breaths

When you think of CPR, you probably visualize someone either doing chest compressions or performing mouth to mouth resuscitation. However, rescue breaths are no longer taught when showing someone how to deliver CPR to a patient.

Take this info with a grain of salt – medical professionals and people with advanced certifications still do perform mouth to mouth, but the American Health Association deemed it less useful for non-medical professionals to perform the procedure. Chest compressions are more important in keeping the patients alive, so the attention is now focused on teaching this method alone.

People without professional medical training have been proven more likely to remember CPR steps during an emergency if they were as simplified as possible. Focusing just on chest compressions increases the patient’s chances of surviving, eliminates worry about transferring disease, and helps get rid of potential error in CPR performance.

No More “Look, Listen, and Feel”

At one point, CPR training included telling students to stop and assess the victim by checking for breath and feeling to see if there’s a problem. Now, they’ve determined it’s pretty much obvious when someone needs CPR to be performed on them, and precious seconds are wasted during the old method. Now, students are told to call 911 as soon as they realize there’s a problem, and start administering CPR as quickly as possible.

A Change of Steps

Old CPR guidelines dictated that students follow A-B-C steps in the order of clearing the patient’s airway, giving rescue breaths, and then delivering chest compressions. Airway, breaths, compression – A-B-C.

Now, there’s essentially just C – but the other steps still apply in a minor way, if the student is more versed in CPR and the steps are applicable. Now, the steps could be seen as C-A-B, with breaths being the least important step.

An Updated Ratio

About a decade ago, it was taught that for every two breaths students should administer fifteen compressions. Now, the ratio is taught as two breaths for every 30 compressions, if breaths are used at all. This increases the emphasis on chest compressions and takes it away from breathing. Compressions are what circulates the victim’s blood flow to the brain, which is what keeps them alive.

Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger

Old guidelines stipulated that students push about one and a half two inches for each compression on the victim’s chest. Now, it’s recommended that the student push two inches at least, if not more. The worry that resulted in the old guidelines less vigorous compressions was that the victim’s ribs might break, but now it’s determined that harder compressions could save a victim’s life, even if some of their ribs are broken.

100 compressions per minute or more are now recommended to be delivered to a victim, whereas before it was about 100 or less.

Obviously, you need to refresh your CPR skills. Luckily, you can do so easily with CPR classes from FAST Rescue.